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20121206
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
, we look at the science they're saying is behind the cause of it. >>> and the breakup of the beatles. the woman who has always been blamed says in her own voice tonight, it wasn't her. "nightly news" begins now. >>> good evening. she is considered the front-runner to become one of the most powerful women in the world. america's next secretary of state replacing hillary clinton. and after being hammered for weeks by republican critics over the benghazi affair, ambassador susan rice asked for a face-to-face meeting with some of her most vocal critics to make things better. the meeting took place today and appears to have made things worse. so the partisanship on the benghazi issue is alive and well, and the question now becomes, will there be a showdown with the president over his friend and ally, ambassador rice? it's where we begin tonight with our chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell in washington. andrea, good evening. >> good evening, brian. susan rice, by all accounts, the president's top choice to replace hillary clinton, had hoped to mend fences on capitol hill.
it amounts to quack science. this from the american psychiatric association. i'm quoting now. in the last four decades, reparative therapists have not produced any rigorous scientific research to substantiate their claims of cure. until there is such research available, the apa recommends that ethical practitioners refrain from attempts to change individuals' sexual orientation, keeping in mind the medical dictum to first do no harm. stories of harm caused by reparative therapy are what prompted california to recently pass a law barring it for minors. as the apa warns, the harm can include anxiety, depression, even suicide. randi kaye profiled another young man who went through so-called reparative therapy with traumatic results. here's his story. >> reporter: when ryan was 13, his mother read his diary and discovered he was gay. that was the beginning of the most painful years of his life. >> for years, i thought that god hated me because i was gay. >> reporter: ryan says his parents were determined to change him. they signed him up for what's called reparative therapy with the national
. >> clayton: in new york city, women waiting until they're 50 to get married or have kids, beyond science or-- >> right, right. >> clayton: is that a problem? and is marriage the traditional idea of marriage suffering because women want to go further and further into the workplace? >> the idea of traditional marriage is suffering for lot of reason. the article, wasn't the whole kit and caboodle, one aspect that i was passing on, if you will. there's certainly more to the issue, the purpose of my book, how to choose a husband. this was sort after teaser. but the whole attitude for marriage in general, for young people in particular is such a negative one and that's really the premise that i'm concerned about because when you start out thinking so negatively and taught things like never depend on a man and postpone marriage as long as possible. not that there's anything wrong with postponing it, but with that attitude you're probably going to have a self-fulfilling prophesy, but turn it around. this is a good thing. marriage, family-- >> governor huckabee on our show disagreed a little. >> oka
can still invest in things like education, and training and science and research research. i know some of this may sound familiar to you because we talked a lot about this during campaign. this shouldn't be a surprise to anybody. this was a major debate in the presidential campaign and in congressional campaigns all across the country, and a clear majority of americans, not just democrats, but also a lot of republicans and a lot of independents agreed we should have a balanced approach to deficit reduction that doesn't hurt the economy and doesn't hurt middle class families. and i'd glass to see if you've been reading the papers lately that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so, if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. the senate has already passed a bill that keeps income taxes from going up on middle class families. democrats in the house are ready to vote for that same bill today. if we can get a few house republicans to agree as w
they are breaking up families. the republicans are trying to promote for science, technology and engineering and math, whether it's a high skilled visa or a low skilled advice a whether it's farm workers, domestic workers who clean hotepal this is all immigrant labor, and this apalo has an economic component in addition to the fact that many of their churches are telling them we can no longer side with this anti-immigration position. so it is changing out from under them and i think they are going to look for a way that they can change policy without a political backlash. joons we will be talking more about the upcoming elections a little bit later in the hour. a.b. stoddard, thank you. >> thank you. jenna: serious new concerns about a deteriorating situation in syria. why turkey says the bashar al-assad regime may be coming for it next and what our nato ally says it needs to protect its own people. we have a live report just ahead. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy d
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> how's this for irony? mitt romney has finally captured 47% of america. remember this video that sunk the romney campaign? >> there are are 47% of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. 47% who are with him, who are dependent upon government, who believe they are victims, who believe the government has a responsibility to care for them. >> well, the cook report points out romney shared a popular vote of this country has fallen to, you guessed it, 47.4%. as expected to fall further. something about the 47 mark, exactly. ouncer ] jill and her mouth have lived a great life. but she has some dental issues she's not happy about. so i introduced jill to crest pro-health for life. selected for people over 50. pro-health for life is a toothpaste that defends against tender, inflamed gums, sensitivity and weak enamel. conditions people over 50 experience. crest pro-health for life. so jill can keep living the good life. crest. life opens up when you do. bp has paid overthe peopl
by the institute for science and international security. they say they show more activity at an iranian military site. a site that nuclear inspectors have been denied access to. here's what the site looked like in september. the roofs of the buildings are are covered with tarps. just take a look. now, we're going to fast forward it. switch the picture to november 7th. what you'll see now is that the buildings have blue roofs and new equipment on site. this is according to the am sis from sis. the think tank says additional things are being done to the site. a russian judge says performances by pussy riot should be removed from the internet. their most notorious video is the one that landed two band members in jail. in it, the band sings an anti putin song in a cathedral. the judge allegations it includes words that humiliate various groups. >>> and former president george h.w. bush has been in a houston area hospital for six days. a spokesperson says he has been treated and cures of bronchitis. bush is 88 years old and he is the oldest living former president of the united states. >>> and an upd
, prosthetic arms and legs, it is amazing what science and medicine is doing for these young people .. but nobody should estimate, underestimate the magnitude of the rehabilitation challenge and the courage that it takes, day in and day out to try and come back from these terrible wounds and that is where there is not enough we can do for these kids. >> rose: are we over stretched? >> i don't think so. i think we were over stretched at the end of 2006 .. and particularly in the early months of 2007, during the surge in iraq, i think one of the hardest decisions i made, maybe the hardest decision that i made as secretary was extending the length of deployments in iraq and afghanistan from twelve months to 15 months, and we did it for about a year and a half. and two years, and the alternative was to cut short their time at home. so if they were only to serve twelve months in the theatre then they might only be home for nine months or eight months or something, and so the recommendation of all of the generals and others was do the 15 and let them have the year at home, but there is no
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> john mcafee is a famous pioneer of anti-virus software but authorities in belize want to question him about the killing of his neighbor. nobody saw him until he contacted cnn's martin savage and agreed to an interview that was anything but normal. >> reporter: the search to find john mcafee started here at the airport. it began with three simple words. sorry i'm late. a prearranged code word to let me know i'd met the person that would take me to mcafee. what followed was a drive road through winding, twisting streets and then we get in to a parking lot, get in to another vehicle and drive off again. this time with switchbacks, u-turns and back alleys. clearly meant to confuse us as well as anyone following. and then, there we were. face to face. observation number one. with john afee, there's no such thing as a simple answer. you are john mcafee? >> i think so, yes. i am john mcafee. >> reporter: he seemed nervous, anxious. are you afraid? >> wou
competing to win the army's next multi-million dollar contract. he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. we're trying to trick the brain into seeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital patterns recreate shapes already found in nature, and 3-d layering creates depth and shad dose where none exist. that's today's design. but developers already have one eye on tomorrow. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make believe. the military has seen the so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the americ
for consumers of pork. justified fears or junk science. bill: we'll see you then. a red kettle controversy, what is the problem with the salvation army? are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. martha: this is a crazy story, a shooting over a cellphone video in southern california. oakland police say this a couple recorded a car driving erratic lee and the driver noticed that he was being filmed, on the cellphone an pulled up alongside and pointed a gun and demanded the video back. the couple drove away, but the suspects fold and one of the gunmen then gotten to the victim's car and fought with the husband who managed to kick the guy out but not before the gunman fired a shot. nobody was hit thank goodness but boy this is -- there is a l
, science, and research. now, i know some of this may sound familiar to you because we talked a lot about this during the campaign. this shouldn't be a surprise to anybody. this was a major debate in the presidential campaign and in congressional campaigns all across the country and a clear majority of americans, not just democrats but also a lot of republicans and a lot of independents agreed we should have a balanced approach to deficit reduction that doesn't hurt the economy and doesn't hurt middle class families. and i'm glad to see, if you've been reading the papers lately, that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. the senate's already passed a bill that keeps income taxes from going up on middle class families. democrats in the house are ready to vote for that same bill today. if we can get a few house republicans to agree as well, i'll sign this bill as soon as congress sends it my way. i'
and indicted it will never exonerate you. it's considered inadmissible, it's considered junk science. i would advice those kids not to take it. i would go a step further with the mother. i'd tell her to start naming names. if she has specific individuals who she feels are holding things back, like tamara pointed back, they may or may not be and they don't have an obligation to reveal it put some social paper on those individual, put their names in the letter, put it out there publicly. >> that is a risky thing to do. now you're risking opening yourself up to liability or defamation if you name people that are potentially involved in a crime and it didn't occur. martha: i think back to natalee holloway and her mother and how strong here she felt that that young man, joran van der sloot knew what happened, and the people who were with them had more information than they were giving. as a parent it's impossible to imagine when you know that all these people were with her. they went to a bar together, they might know a little bit about who else was there. i have to believe, keith, that these poli
that. >> i took rocks for jocks geology, science requirement. >> i did that too. i almost failed. >> ah. >> seriously, i had pretty -- i had really good grades as long as it was liberal arts but had to take one more science class and waited till the last semester and started calculating out my average, it was like, objection, my god, i got to get a 94 on this test -- i failed and i -- had like a "d" and i don't graduate and my family is coming up. talk about sweating. i'm sweating just thinking about it high. >> you hit the number though. >> i hit the number. >> you could do that math. >> i could do that math. >> les miles is doing math as we speak as he thinks -- >> should les go to arkansas. >> 5.25 versus -- >> lsu expects you to be number one every year. if you're not they hate you. >> build the program up. that's exciting. >> all right. >> get lsu to pay more. >> which i think he's due. i think this is negotiations. >> i don't think you need to say that for him but you still helped him. still ahead the author of a buying gras fry on winston churchill discusses the life of the rever
science -- that we can end the aids pandemic in the next 30 years. how exciting is that? >> but also how depressing is it when you look at this information that comes from the cdc that says more than half of the young people in the united states infected with hiv are not aware of it, people 13 to 24. 13 to 24 account for 26% of all the new hiv infections. those are people who should know better. we've had 30 years of medical research on this. >> yeah. but we actually can end aids by getting a small cohort of people around the world on to treatment. we have a small window of time. in the past for every new person we were getting on to treatment there were two new hiv infections. so the rate of hiv infections was always outpacing the number of people we could get on to treatment. when people are on treatment it's almost impossible for them to spread the hiv virus. with the tools we have right w now, with the distribution of condoms and hiv medications, you don't have to see statistics like that in 30 years. if these budget cuts go through, we'll be talking about why are these scary stati
the moon. horrendous concepts he hopes that will stay in science fiction forever. >> i love going back and seeing what they were thinking about doing in the '50s. whole different era. most of us won't need advice on how to spend a lottery jackpot. but our guest knows the feeling of seeing the winning numbers on a ticket and asking herself what's next. [ male announcer ] when this hotel added aflac to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yelling ] [ male announcer ] find out more at... [ duck ] aflac! [ male announcer ] ...forbusiness.com. ♪ ha ha! bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. social security are just numbers
says it intends to launch a rocket. it claims it's for science and he research purposes some time between december 10th and december 22nd. >>> we're getting our first look at ashton kutcher as steve jobs. resemblance from a young jobs right out of the garage is striking. it will premiere at the film festival in january. >> it really works. >> it does work. >> the average person today will process more data in a single day than a person did -- internet, computer and make it visual to show all the patterns within it and turn those patterns into some kind of an action, because you can really change lives. that is the press of a new premise called big data. "the human face of big data" ," new book, showing us how it's already giving us information. a day in the life book series. good morning. nice to have you with us. >> thanks for having me here. >> data is the new oil and you look for patterns. explain to me why that is and how patterns have a value. >> my 10-year-old son has heard me on the phone saying big data. and he said what is it? >> imagine if you're looking through one eye
would develop in their other breast. doctors say the science suggests for most women that fear is unfounded. >> the idea that by doing bigger surgery you're being safer and helping ensure a better outcome just simply true. >> there are some notable exceptions. women with a very strong family history of breast cancer, at least two or more immediate relatives, and those who carry very strong genetic mutations, for those women, yes, having a double mastectomy may be advisable, but those are the individuals who must make those decisions talking to their doctors and fear, we found, is the overriding reason people are having those, not the individual family decisions. >> let me pick up on that. let me be devil's advocate. no woman wants to do a double mastectomy but if she feels she should is there any harm? >> it's a major surgery. having a breast removed is not a simple operation. you also leave some breast tissue behind. place a bet that there's a 70% chance of you not ever having trouble or 90% chance, would you go ahead and have major surgery, the answer is no. we've let the fea
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)